Special Guest Expert - Chris Carr

Special Guest Expert - Chris Carr: Video automatically transcribed by Sonix

Special Guest Expert - Chris Carr: this mp4 video file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Brian Kelly:
So here's the big question. How are entrepreneurs like us who have been hustling and struggling to make it to success, who seem to make it one step forward? Only to fall two steps back. We're dedicated. And driven. How do we finally break through? And with that is the question. And this podcast will give you the answers. My name is Brian Kelly. And this is the Mind Body Business Show. Hello, everyone, and welcome, welcome, Welcome to the Mind Body Business show. I love what I get to do because we bring on guests from so many different facets of business, of education, of. Anything and everything that can help you to further your self in either your business life or your personal life, or even both. And that's why I love what I get to do because of amazing guests that I have on this show like you are about to see in the form of Mr. Chris Carr. You're going to love this young man because of the mission he is on and what he is doing for our students in college. Oh, it's going to be an amazing show and there are many lessons to learn. And so it's not just about college and scholastics, but there are many messages under the hood that are going to help you to elevate your life going forward. So sit tight and really, really integrate what you hear from Chris when we bring him on, which will be in just a few moments, the Mind body business show. I had this show developed with you in mind, the businessperson, the entrepreneur who is looking to get that next step ahead, that next tip, that next strategy to model. And in my well, many years on this planet, about a decade of which I spent studying only successful people, and I concentrated on those because I started getting very curious. I'm like, why is this person more successful than, say, myself? Why is that person more successful than that person I just studied and on and on and on. And so I began studying. I had mentors, authors, people I knew personally, who I met and worked with, others who I've never met before. But I have read their books and I've followed them on video.

Brian Kelly:
Others who are no longer with us, who have long since passed and just dove deep and realized during all this time that there were three common things that kept bubbling to the top. And you probably guess what those are, because it's the very title of the show mind is to a person each of these successful people had mastered. Their mindset. That's what the mind stands for in the mind body business show mindset they have. They had developed a very positive, very powerful. And the most important part was a very flexible mindset and body was exactly what you probably think that means. That means they took care and take care of those who are still with us, of their bodies, both physically and nutritionally. And then business. Business is very, very multifaceted. And what I found is these individuals had mastered the skill sets that are required to build and scale a thriving business, successful business. When I say skill sets, what does that mean? Skill sets like sales, marketing, team building, systematizing leadership. Scaling your business. I mean, it just goes on and on. And I could go on for quite a while with all the different things that are really crucial for you to master. The good news is you personally actually do not need to personally master all of these skill sets yourself. What's the magic key to this? You may ask. Yes, it is. If you were to master just one of those skill sets and it was one in that small list I just gave. If you master just one. Because, look, mastering anything can take a very long time. What is it? To become an expert at anything? Takes an average of focused effort of I think it was 10000 hours, which is a long time now. Add five or six skill sets to master and goodness sakes, it's going to take a long time. So if you just master this one skill set, then the rest can fall into place. Does anybody out there watching a listening care to know what that one skill set is? No cheating for those who have seen this show before. I'll tell you, regardless, it is a skill set of drum roll.

Brian Kelly:
I need to get that soundbite. Leadership. Leadership is the skill set. If you master that skill set or even if you're in the process of mastering that skill set, If you're improving in that, you can now pull in other individuals into your team who are also who have also mastered skill sets you have yet to master. Or maybe they're in the process of mastering them as well. And now you have a team and collectively your business, your company has mastered all the skill sets that are necessary to build a thriving and successful business. Now, don't don't freak out. Don't worry. You don't have to do all this at once. Start with one and build your business like all of us do. We do it one foot at a time. How do you. How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time. Yes, it does take time. But at least you know how to prioritize your time and go after mastering the skill set of leadership, even if you have no team right now at all. And that means you want to master the skill set of leading yourself. What kind of culture do you want your business? How do you want to be looked at as a peer? How do you want people to look at you as a leader? How do you want your business to be run? Do you want a positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement? Lots of great things to look into. Many great books have been written on it. And another great artifact of all these successful people is that to a person they are also very successful readers of books. And with that, I want to segway very quickly into a little segment I affectionately call bookmarks.

Announcer:
Bookmarks. Going to read bookmarks. Ready, Steady. Read bookmarks brought to you by reach your peak library dot com.

Brian Kelly:
And yes, Chris, car is coming on very, very soon, I promise you. Reach your peak library, Dotcom. Now, before I go any further. A word of caution. And that is while you're listening tonight, especially to Chris, you're going to learn about other resources, other websites, maybe books. There there are many resources that come out of the show. Rather than scratch that itch and go off and click off and look at that resource while the show is going on. Instead of doing that, what I would implore of you to do is get out a good old fashioned piece of paper and a pen, or even do it on your computer, on your notebook, notepad or what have you, and just write it down. I was going to bring mine up. It's electronic and it went to sleep on me. So But just bring that up and write it down. And what you want to do is visit it after the show is over. There we go. Finally came back. And so I've got mine started. I've got show notes getting ready to write down the notes of Mr. Chris Carr because I know he's going to just crush it. And so the reason is, is because if you take your focus away for just one moment while you're examining something else, like, say, reach your peak library, but let's say Chris is talking and he drops a nugget that could have changed your life forever for the better. But you missed it because your focus was on reading Reach your Peak library. What are these books in here? Instead? Write it down and visit it after the show so you don't miss that one golden nugget that could change your life forever. I always say the magic happens in the room, so stay in the quote unquote virtual room. Stay focused, stay attentive. Especially when Chris comes on. That's my soapbox moment. And I now stepping down off of that box. Here we go. Reach your peak library is a site I literally had developed with you and mind. And why is that? I myself did not become a voracious reader until about 11 years ago at the age of 47.

Brian Kelly:
I know you're all doing the math. You got to figure it out by now. And yeah, so I started reading at a very late age, and I started reading a lot because I learned very quickly that it had a great impact on my results. And that's what all of this is all about, is about getting you greater results and doing so in a shorter amount of time. It's not cheating anything. It's just doing it smart and knowing how to take those quote unquote integrity based shortcuts. And so I compiled this list of books that I personally had read over a period of time. And not every book on here, not every book I've ever read is on here, just those that had an impact on me, a positive impact on either business or personal or both of lives. And so this is literally a gift to you. You just got to reach your peak library. Write that down, go to it later, Pick out the first book that jumps off the page. Go get it from any source. Amazon, a bookstore. This is not for the purpose of making money. You can click a link and go to Amazon off this page. Whatever your favorite form of getting books are from, go get it from there, but just pick one and start reading today, the next book, or maybe your first book, and that is Reach your Peak library. And one of the great things about great resources, we have the most amazing resource waiting for you right now in the wings by the name of Chris Carr. So I think it's time to bring this young man on and let's have some fun. Here we go.

Announcer:
It's time for the guest expert spotlight, savvy, skillful, professional, adept, trained. Big league qualified.

Brian Kelly:
And there he is. Ladies and gentlemen. Yes, it is the one. It is the only Chris Carr. Welcome to the show, my man. How are you doing?

Chris Carr:
Hey, Brian. Thanks for having me. Great. Great to be here.

Brian Kelly:
Oh, my goodness. It's such a blessing to have someone like you. And people will find out why in just a moment. And I can't wait to dive in and peel open. And I mean that figuratively, that beautiful brain of yours to see what you are up to and how you are impacting lives and how it will affect everyone watching the show in a great way. Before we do that real quick, a little bit of housekeeping. You know, we've got to pay the bills here on the mind body business show. So we'll show some quick ads and then we'll come back to Chris in just a moment. So stick with us. We'll be right back. Hey, if you're watching the Mind Body business show live right now, then you will have the ability to win a five night stay at a five star luxury resort of your choosing, compliments of the big insider Secrets. What is it? It is a five night vacation Stay to one of many destinations across the world. You can see as we go through this very quickly, there are some in Branson and Daytona Beach. These are in the United States, all over the United States, New Orleans, San Diego. There's also Mexico. There's also the UK and Argentina. I mean, it just keeps going on and on and on. Australia, at the end of this show, you will be given the ability to enter, to win. You must be watching this live. If you're not watching live, then head on over to the mind body business show com and register to receive automated notifications when we go live the next time. We do not spam, we do not even pitch any products or anything from that notification. It's just simply a way for you to know that we're alive. And now you can join us and you can also participate in this incredible, incredible prize. And you do not want to miss us. So come on live. And you do not want to miss a moment because of our incredible guest experts and stay on to the end. And we will reveal that at the very end. And. If you're struggling with putting a live show together and it's overwhelming and you want a lot of the processes done for you while still enabling you to put on a high quality show and connect with great people and grow your business all at the same time, then write this down.

Brian Kelly:
Carpet bomb marketing dot com. Then head on over to it after the conclusion of tonight's show. Carpet bomb marketing saturate the marketplace with your message and to get a free lifetime membership to a phenomenal resource called the Richer P Club. Your free membership will include instant access to deep discounts on major software services and top shelf training courses that you need to run your successful business. Think of it as your entrepreneur. Discount house. Catapult your business to the next level. Sign up for free now and get a hotel discount card worth $200 just for joining. Then go and grab your deep discount. So write this down. And then after the show once again head on over to reach your peak Club Dotcom. All right, now let's get back to the show. Yes. Let's do that, shall we? Let's get to Chris car and let's introduce this young man and give him the respect he deserves. That's sound cool, Chris.

Chris Carr:
Yeah, sounds great.

Brian Kelly:
All right, Chris. Car holds a PhD. That means he's smart. Ladies and gentlemen, in Slavic studies from Brown University and has worked in higher education for the past 15 years, helping young people grow. After consistently observing that students were often unprepared and unsupported in key areas, he founded one point members mentorship to guide students through the crucial transition into college and to help them set up lives that truly light them up. I mean, come on, we all know this is badly needed. Currently, today, one point helps students to develop their own personal visions, identify limiting beliefs that hold them back, and craft a plan for execution and accountability in all areas of their lives, emphasizing the importance of academic writing. And I love this last part. Leadership skills. Oh, boom, I love it. Now, officially, formally. Welcome to the show, Mr. Carr. I'm so happy to have you on. So.

Chris Carr:
Thanks, Brian. So excited to be here.

Brian Kelly:
Oh, my goodness. And so I'm curious, we were talking a little bit before the show getting to know you. I love to hear your background. What led you down this path ultimately to doing what you're doing today? And then explain a little bit about what you are doing today and a little bit more depth than what I just read there a moment ago, if you don't mind.

Chris Carr:
Yeah, sure. Yeah, It's been. It's been the scenic route, I like to call it taking that, taking the scenic route to get here. But it's it's interesting looking back to see how all the different things like combine to what's what's happening right now. And so I've been working in higher education for 15 years and that kind of started. I've always had a passion for education. I actually studied business as an undergraduate, but then I joined the Peace Corps. I lived overseas and taught overseas as a Peace Corps volunteer for two years. And that's where I started on this path to kind of where where I am and how I got into the Slavic studies, the Russian language and literature. I was in Central Asia, so to learn Russia. And while I was over there and then I started teaching a few years later back in New York City, where I'm from at a community college, and I loved it. It was the first job. I had had a bunch of jobs before that, and the first job that I really loved was teaching. I taught right, academic writing. And it was it was wonderful. And that led to my my PhD in academic, academic work. And then the the job that I had most recently, which kind of expanded upon I kind of went from teaching in the classroom to a more broad job more broadly around mentorship and working with students who were there, getting ready to graduate and applying, applying for certain things like the Rhodes Scholarship or the Fulbright Scholarship, and and helping them not just with the academic components of that application, but, you know, helping them manage or develop and articulate their visions. What are what are the questions they really want to work on in their lives? Not necessarily like what are the job titles do they want, but what do that what are the where do they want to be operating in the world? We'll go to the big questions they want to be working on or really investigate. And that that really helped me to. That added a lot to the already the academic background and the love for teaching to to help students really carve their forge and help them to figure out what where their path at least begins.

Chris Carr:
Because, you know, there's a tendency to. Want to figure out everything when you're 18 or 19 or 20 and find out your whole life and it just doesn't work that way. So it's just getting off and being kind of asking the right questions, investigating the right questions. And that's kind of what that combined with my own personal journey with. Yeah, struggles like things dealing with like, like a lot of anxiety or questioning where I, where I, where my own path is. So getting into you mentioned the leadership, the leadership skills that's been the last five or so, 3 to 5 years of my life, like focus on that. And that's it just opened my world up in so many ways and led me to to want to support students because I saw that they weren't they were getting maybe they were going to college and getting studying for whatever they're going to study and looking to get these jobs or whatever they want to do, but not really knowing themselves and not really knowing exactly what they wanted. And that was my own experience back as an undergraduate, too. And so that's it's a combination of like what I'm doing now is a combination of like my own experience versus my combined with my academic and professional work and, and personal personal journey to really help students like the things I've been learning in the last couple of years about leadership and personal development. I wish I had someone telling me when I was 18, 19 and 20. And that's what that's really the core of what the main reason why I am moving away from working at the job I was at at Brown University to starting this venture at one point. Mentorship to support students and to to have an impact on more students at that stage, when to really get them to like to understand their core values and yes, yes, money, jobs and salaries and things like that are important. All the numbers. But. What? What is driving you underneath all that? What do you actually care about and value? What? Like those are the things that I think I definitely didn't know as an undergraduate. I didn't spend time on. I didn't know I had to.

Chris Carr:
I didn't know that was what what I was supposed to do. And at the time and I think the more we can get these ideas and in front of young people and getting them thinking about it, the better, the better off individually they'll be. And societally and more collectively will be be as well.

Brian Kelly:
All I have to say is, where were you when I was in college, brother?

Chris Carr:
Yeah. I ask myself. I ask myself the same thing. Like, where was this 20 years ago?

Brian Kelly:
I mean, I don't mean to really minimize it all, but really college. I've been through it myself. Graduated. It doesn't really prepare you for life so much. It doesn't prepare you for reality, in my mind. Now, looking back, it prepared me to be very good or better than most on, say, a trivia game show. Yeah, so all we knew are facts and figures, but how do you apply them? Where do you apply them? Why are we applying them? And you just hit that you're hitting the why? Why do you want to do this? Do you want to do this? I wish I had known that. Oh my gosh. I would have saved me 15 to 20 years of being in an actual career working for a corporation. I would not have done it. I look back going, What the heck was I thinking? Wasting? It's not a waste. I learned a lot and I've applied much of what I learn now toward my entrepreneurship per company. But I could have learned it much sooner and I would have been happier a lot longer for a lot longer duration. It was a grind. I hated going to work, even though I somewhat enjoyed what I was doing on occasion. Most of it was just a bunch of just following like sheep, doing what you're told when, when you're told to do it. And it didn't feel like you were really helping anybody except your own pocket and the corporation to grow their business. But that was about it. And, you know, it's helping my family, which is important, and I get that. But that was it. It was like two, two fold helping two things, and that's it. I was like, That isn't enough. And I realized later in life, I'm not wired that way. I got to get out of this stuff. I'm not I'm not employable anymore. Oh, my gosh. We got several people. Lauren Hood, she is a frequent target of this show. Hello. And she said from South Carolina, And my good friend, Oh, you know about her. I was telling you all about her.

Brian Kelly:
Brigitta Yes. Brigitta Chris is going to be reaching out to you after the show. Brigitta is a master NLP trainer. Grandmaster, I think is the title. In her case, she's like all the way to the top and she has a fantastic NLP center and does a lot of great things and I can't recommend her high enough to all those watching and listening you can't hear. I'll put her name up there. Write it down. Brigitta. Hopefully. I know it doesn't sound like and I'm probably butchering it again. I've been practicing for years and sorry Birgitta, if I did that again, but write that name down and then go look her up and check her out and reach out to her. She will change your life for sure. And so just like Chris Carr is going to change the lives of so many students, you know, And that's what entrepreneurship in my mind is all about, is serving people, elevating them, getting them to that next step, giving them that integrity based shortcut, if you will, to get to the results faster just because they now know the correct path to get there. We're all just going in these different paths trying to find the end result, which is over there. But we're making all these turns and twists, sometimes turning around backwards and then going sideways and then around. And ultimately finally, after 15, 20 years, there it is. What if you could do it in five years? That's what this show is about. And that's what Chris is here to help with students, to help them to get on the right path sooner, which I wish I had that knowledge as well, just as Chris admitted he wished he did for himself. That's the good thing, though, Chris, You've been through it yourself. You know the side that you don't want students to go through that you experienced, and that helps you to to help steer them in the correct direction. Would you say that's a fair assessment?

Chris Carr:
Absolutely. I think it's so it's so easy to we just it just kind of happens unconsciously. We kind of go along with what we see around us growing up. And there's nothing necessarily wrong with all that. But it might not be what's good, what's best for you individually. And I think it's it's it's important for students to understand that, yes, there's they are connected to their families and their communities and whatever the universities or whatever else that they might be involved in. But ultimately their lives are there. You're responsible for your own life and your own path and to find what really speaks to you, what really lights you up, like you're not like we're not doing like the the more people that are working and doing things that don't light them up, we're not doing yourself individually, ourselves or collectively ourselves any, any service by by suffering through or just slogging through our life. Life is a struggle, or we have to work like we just have to work at these places that we might not like to go to because that's just what we do here. And there's nothing there's nothing wrong with that. This is not this is not saying one thing is, you know, that's that's what what people are doing. But I think eventually it kind of catches up with people. And that's where that's where the midlife crisis comes up. We feel like there's you mentioned books. There's a great book on the not called midlife crisis called the Middle Passage. And it's about kind of like the two, like the first adulthood is like ages 20 to 40, and we kind of act out all the things we learned from the people around us. And then we get to middle mid midlife or mid-career or whatever it might be, and then realize this might not be the best thing for me. And, and then you might by that point, you might be you might have a family and a lot of responsibilities that it might make it really difficult to get on the path that really is best for you. So the sooner we can be aware of these things when we're younger, we might not get there. You might not get to that path when you're 21.

Chris Carr:
It might take some time to get there. But the more and the more that you're like, we're aware of who you are and what you value, what your interests are, what really what excites you and doesn't mean every day is going to be a picnic, doesn't mean you're not going to have to do tasks you don't want to do. But but the driving vision behind everything is really going to going to light you up and excite you. And and I think the like there's a lot of pressure on students and increasingly so I've seen it here the last bunch of years, especially, I think, with how competitive it is to get into college, how expensive it is, how just. How organized. I think I read all these articles on how much teen anxiety there is, and I feel like, you know, that's a period of life where there's a lot of anxiety. But I think more and more so and the thing is unnecessary. I think kind of there's a lot of voices coming in and a lot of confusion about or a lot of options are not sure where where to go or a lot of anxiety, not not sure how to use your voices as a young person or or there's just so many different things that that kind of get in the way of that make it really easy to make the choice of, well, this is what I know, so I'm going to stay here. This is my comfort zone. I'm going to stay here. And and that's that's one thing. Again, doing through personal experience. I still even the more I learn about this stuff, it's still a conscious effort to be like, okay, like realizing, oh, I'm slipping back into that comfort zone. Get back kind of go back into, get back into it. It's like two different. It's like a switch that goes you could you could turn it from one like on and off if you're aware of it. But in the beginning, like you're just you just wasn't aware of it. Like it just happens automatically and it just. Yeah, it's there's just too many I think there's so many people out there who are just under like not just a lot of pressure, but listening to under the influence of a lot of other voices other than their own.

Chris Carr:
And I think it it's good to listen to other voices and take advice and but you really, really need to seek out the people that are that speak to you and find the path that works for you. And and also I think it's also along with that, it's not just about figuring that out at a younger age, but understanding that. You know, you're going to change a lot of times like who you are at 20 is not who you're going to be at 40 that crazy. And the students, when you're young, you don't have the perspective of what it's like to be 30 or 40 or 50. And being in a place where you don't want to be or and feeling like you can't change. So it's not just like getting a better sense of your path at a young age, but knowing that you're learning the tools to handle all that because life is going to you're going to take a turn at some point later on and you're going to need to go through that process again. Like, Oh, maybe my goals are different now that I'm 30 or 40. When I was compared to when I was 20. I need to reevaluate where maybe my vision is changing and these are just things that are being talked about more and more, thankfully, but not enough. Not enough in the mainstream and not enough with students who are just like. Have a lot of pressure on them to be super high achievers, but not really. Maybe not necessarily do the things that they're. That they're interested in.

Brian Kelly:
Yeah, it's a very impressionable age when they enter college and what parents are doing, unbeknownst to them, when they're paying that ticket to college, as they're paying for a free ride to party for four years. And almost every I know and you and I both knew many students, including ourselves, we go in there and we're trying to find our identity. We don't know what that is. And we are away from home. For the first time in our lives, we don't have the parents looming over us telling us how to live our lives, when to get up where or what we're going to eat, all that stuff. And we're like, what? It's confusing, it's volatile, and it's a very vulnerable time for people, all kids going in. And now the mind is wide open and it's going to absorb everything that's coming in, input, input. And then they say, Oh, party and oh, life is all about go to college, learn great trivia questions, put it on your resume and go get a job, work that job, and then get your family do that, get a house, work 40 hours a week commute if you have to do whatever it takes when you're done with the job, retire and then die. I mean, that's what I got out of it. After looking back now, I'm like, Whoa, If I had made that picture like you so astutely said, you don't know this stuff when you're 20 until you have life experience, you look back on Damn. And now you look back, you go, I'm not doing that. And here's the thing. I think that's important. And what you're doing is you're letting you're revealing to these students that there are options. There are options out there that none that you nor I knew existed. There are other options in addition to college, in addition to getting schooling so you can get that diploma that's becoming more and more worthless as time goes on to end. And employers, they all want experience. And my son just went through this. He had a degree in marketing in business, and not a single company would take him up unless he had experience. He's like, Where am I supposed to get that?

Brian Kelly:
You know, I just went through school for the very purpose of. And so it's getting harder and harder. And just to know that there are options that you can if you if you are wired to work on your own, start your own business, work with somebody else in a smaller business. But just to know that there are options out there and to know how to navigate the college landscape like you, Chris, are showing them how to do so in the education sphere. What's going on in colleges? It's been a long time since I've been on any campus or in a classroom. You seem to be much closer to that pulse. What is going on right now in education that might be different than when you and I attend? I can't. You're probably way younger than I am, but.

Chris Carr:
Maybe not much. Maybe not that much. I don't know. I'm I'm 46. I just I grew up without without cell phones and technology and stuff like that. That's a big a big change, obviously. Yeah.

Brian Kelly:
So what's going on now? Is it good? Is it bad? Is it a little of both? What's going on?

Chris Carr:
Yeah, it's. It's. It's still I think it's definitely it's definitely both. Like, like most things. It's both. There's a lot of great things that can come out of a residential college experience. It's really like, you know, to think of it like if you're if you you're leaving home, maybe for the usually for the mostly most people go for the first time. They're away from home for the first time, haven't really been outside of their home town most most students and you're just you just get to meet so many people from different states and countries and different backgrounds. And and that alone is a great value. It's a great that's almost worth the price of admission. I mean, I think the price is way too high. Like, you know, that's that's that's something we'll get into in a second. But it's really there are so many things to get out of the college experience still. And a lot of it is just exposure to new ideas because we don't again, we're in high school and we have we have these whatever our influences are and we think we know ourselves maybe or what we want to do. And then just getting out there, just having the opportunity to explore is something that I think I think is there's less of an emphasis on because there's so much pressure, so much more pressure. It's something like it's so much more competitive just to get into college these days. And even as from high school, like applying as an undergraduate, students have to almost you almost have to know, know exactly what you want to study. And that's good. It's good to have an idea. But one of the one of the most beautiful things about the residential college experience is like is just how many things are are available and how many things are to explore. And that's kind of tied into the freedom of being away, which is, which is beautiful in one sense, but also really intimidating and really and really difficult and can get you very easily, like you mentioned, and about easily getting into like partying all the time or I'm going to take I'm just going to I'm going to major in business because that's what people are doing or that's what I think is going to get me a good job someday, even though I'm not.

Chris Carr:
I don't even know if I'm interested in it or not or or whatever it might be. And and there's nothing wrong with any of those things. But it's more about like, like you said, like learning about who you are and the it's almost like today I feel like today there's almost the expectation on students to know who they are before they even get there, like when they're in high school and graduate. And I think that's so unfair. It's unfair. It's unrealistic. And it leads to a lot of even if even if they do stay on that path, here's what I know I want to do and I'm only going to do this. You almost you lose like a lot of the experience of that, those growth opportunities. And yeah, it's just I think there's just a lot of a lot of pressure and a lot of that comes with the cost. Like students are taking out a lot of loans and a lot of cases to to go to school. And like, I mean, I don't I don't blame students for thinking of, okay, what are the what job am I going to get after that's going to help me pay these back. And that's a that's a fair thing. But that shouldn't be the first thing, I think. Ultimately it has to be driven by the the student and what they what they want. And if it's if where your passions are, if it's if it's in an area that's not on the top ten list of highest salaried professions, like doesn't mean you don't go you don't go there. It doesn't mean you abandon yourself to just to go to that list. And I think that's happening a lot, mostly because of the sticker price of college. I think it's gotten way too expensive, but it's still it's still can be a very beautiful growth. It could be it can be such a springboard to a life that. Is beautiful is great, and that is really growth giving and allows students to expand themselves and to grow in their interests and to make a contribution in some way to themselves, their families and their communities. And but at the same time, it's really easy.

Chris Carr:
It's really easy to slip into what everyone else around them is doing, what my parents expect from me, what my salary expectations are because of how expensive it is, or just slipping into like partying all the time and stuff like that, which is it's fun to do. So the social aspect is something that should should be a part of the college experience. But yeah, that's kind of I think what I'm learning is what I've learned is like it's really has to be a combination. It's not just the academic and professional.

Brian Kelly:
Yes.

Chris Carr:
It's that it's the it's the what are your hobbies? What are your personal interests? What are your social interests? What are your like? How do you want to have an impact beyond your individual life? And I think I think there's just just a lot a lot of I think those things aren't emphasized like how expansive the experience could be is not emphasized. I think it's the undergraduate experience has become too professional, like pre professional, it's too pre professionalized and in a way like only focus on what the career is going to be. And that definitely has to be a consideration, of course. But but it's become overly so. And I think I think students aren't maybe taking advantage of and this is not I mean, some people do, I think just on a whole, like just always kind of wary of generalizing. But I think I think it's really easy just to get caught up in all those different things and the voices of other people and that and that really like follow your passion. Yeah. And I think, like you said, there's also a lot of other options. College is still a great option. It's a great option. You can can grow, you can grow in so many ways. You meet all these great, wonderful people. But with technology, like it's easy, it's so easy. Not that it's easy to start a business, but it's much easier to start your own venture if you have that inclination and have an idea. So like maybe college isn't. If college, the college path isn't right for an individual student, like there it's much easier to do other things these days, I think then then say like when I then I didn't feel like there were any other options really. Like I didn't like, oh, high school college, get a job, right? Like that's that's what I'm supposed to do. That's about what people do or what what else would I do? Like, I didn't didn't feel like there were a lot of other options other than that. And now I think today and yeah, in this year, 2023, now there's so many there are other other paths that students need to be aware of where of if, if it fits them better.

Brian Kelly:
I think it's a two way street. You know, it's it's so important to know what you do want to do that you do like to do. It's equally as important to know what you don't like, but you don't know either until you go through the process of taking the different courses and going down different paths and finding out, Yeah, oh, maybe. No, not at all. And then you can start and this is the way life works even now. Chris I don't know if you agree with this, but I'm 58 and I'm still adjusting course as I go through life and saying, I like this, I'm going this direction. Okay? I think I like it even more if I just course correct a little bit. And then if that was the wrong turn, I'm going to go back the other direction and it just never stops. I think we just get better at it and we're better at fine tuning it and we're heading more in the right direction than we were when our younger. But when you're younger, you don't know where to turn. You could do a 360 and not know if your point in the right direction. You just have to go forward in any direction to determine if that's the direction you want to continue on and then adjust your course as you go accordingly. Is that does that all help when you think explain how life works when you're.

Chris Carr:
Yeah, Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. We definitely get better at it the more the more we're out there doing different things. But yeah, you have to try it. Like it's not just about. Any. And. I think expectations are a bit or a big thing like its openness and expectations. Like if you're trying something and if you're I think in your mind, if you're telling yourself it has to something has to work out a certain way and it could so easily not work out exactly that way, but it could still be really good. But you might think, Oh, that's not my thing. But maybe your expectations kind of really make the experience not what what it could be. It could be maybe something like that. Like learning that, learning to be to have being being driven by that vision and what those interests are, but being open to the experience as well. Not having it, not needing it to be a certain way, like letting it play out and giving it. I think patience is a wonderful, wonderful thing as well. Like right these days everything happens so quickly and people want there's no attention span anymore and like we need to slow down and stop, like give things some time. Like, like just because even if you take take one course in a field that maybe you're exploring and don't like it, that could be a reason not to go there again. But it could also be maybe it was just that one quote. Maybe if you really have an inkling to try it, like try it again. I mean, maybe if you're trying something 20 to 20 times, maybe you should go to something different. But like, can't let like like life has to be just like a process of trial and error in that way and allowing for it like, the mistake is not a mistake. It's just feedback. It's learning. You learn something from that.

Brian Kelly:
And it could be that that individual would have loved that course. It was just the instructor that rubbed them the wrong way or they didn't connect with. I mean, there are so many moving parts to every part of this. And if you it's like, Oh my gosh, I was just looking at this professional football. You have a quarterback currently in the league that was the number one draft pick and a Heisman Trophy winner who got let go by a team. I mean, just said by get out one of the best quarterbacks talent wise. Well he was in the wrong system. He moved to another system that was more attuned to his style of play. And now he's he's flourishing once again. And it's similar in in life. It's like it doesn't mean that what that situation is is horrible. An all encompassing horrible is look at every piece of it and go, well, maybe the leader is not somebody I connect with. So use that, try that vocation again, but go after a different company or a different leader. In that case, I was curious, what are some like tangible obstacles that you can think of that you know of that young adults are facing right now in education and then in going into their career? What are the things that are holding them back? Is it is it in their mind? Is it societal? What is it that's keeping students from being the best that they want to be?

Chris Carr:
I think I think a lot of it kind of some of them are things we mentioned already is like just the the pressure either to achieve or to get to that final to go from where they are to like to the endpoint already and not like I want to go from where I am to having that job, where I'm secure and, and whether financially or it's fulfilling or whatever and not letting the process play out, you're not going to like the expectation to, I think, to go through college and get your first job out and you're going to make whatever you think you're going to make six figures or whatever right off the bat or whatever it may be, and that doesn't happen. It could be disappointing if your expectations are are are at are there. But if you see it as like, here's my starting point. This is not this is the start of my growth journey. Like, I think there's like the way that we look at it. Like if it's just the path of the end, a path towards an end result, that's where a lot of I think a lot of issues can come up. But if it's there's an emphasis on this is this is the beginning of my adult journey, which is about growth and learning about who I am. And like you said, like maybe like learning who I am so I can get to the point where I know that I know the conditions that will make me happy or satisfied or I mean, happiness is kind of a tricky, tricky word sometimes, but like so won't get too much into that. But like, where where will I be, quote unquote, either successful or fulfilled? And that might be, like you said, it might be the right career, but maybe you're working in a big company and you need to work in a smaller company. Maybe it's the type of boss you're working for. Maybe for me, it's been I always feel like. Like I. Work better or I didn't work as well within highly, highly structured organizations. And it was nice to go in and like, Oh, they tell you what to do and you do it. And I go home and whatever at 5:00 and whatever I go, whatever I go, yeah, then work is over and other things happen.

Chris Carr:
But for me, like and that's okay. That's, I guess if that's aligned with, with who you are, that's great. But for me, I always felt that there was something like, like my skills or my interest weren't really I wasn't able to tap into those things in that really rigid structure. So so for me, I'm learning. This is why one of the reasons why I'm starting this venture is to get to allow myself to space to be to do things, not just to do things the way I want to, but to let my ideas flourish or my creativity or do things the way the way that I like that maybe I couldn't do it. I definitely couldn't do it at my last position. So that's something that you and that's not for everybody, but that's something we need to. Student Young people and older people, all people, but especially if we're talking about young people like need to learn about who they are and what situations are conducive to their best growth and their flourishing. And you don't know that without failing that you're going to you're going to fail. And I don't even want to call it failure. It's just it's feedback. It's learning. And it's not it's not a mistake. It's you learn something about yourself and then this isn't the right situation for me. And then you then you can ask that you can reflect. If you don't, if you don't like the job that you're at, you can reflect. Is it the is it the actual work? Is it the type of organization like here there are tangible things that you can reflect on. And then, of course. Correct. You know, you can you can go to a different company or maybe you need to maybe you do need to go to a totally different industry. There's there's ways to do that without feeling stuck in that in that position. Or, you know, I studied this thing for four years and spent all this money. Now I have to stay here and I can't change.

Brian Kelly:
My.

Chris Carr:
Parents. My parents expect me to be this. There's there's these are all now these are all real things. And I'm not and there's no there's no blame anywhere. There's no anything. But I think it's. You know, results are important, obviously, but I think there needs to be more. Students need to be taught. Even before way before college, that life is a growth process. And yeah.

Brian Kelly:
And it's okay to to course correct and be wrong.

Chris Carr:
Yeah. You're supposed to put yourself out there and try different things. And that's how that's the only way to figure out where where you get to end up.

Brian Kelly:
Yeah. Everything is focused on, like you were saying, the result and rarely on the journey to get through that result. And you're seeing a lot of great stuff about, you know, another fantastic side benefit of going to an actual college is you're developing your social skills and you are getting and learning and refining what your own identity is, and even that changes over time. But at least you are getting the cornerstone, the baseline. That is not what your parents told you your personality should be or your identity is. Your identity is not your vocation, by the way. Like if someone says I am a I am a heart surgeon. Oh, okay. That's your vocation. That's not what you are. That's your vocation. It's a great thing that you do that and that you identify with the fact that that's your vocation. That's great. But who are you truly inside are, you know, it's so much deeper than just that. And I think it's very important that people, especially parents, recognize the fact that they're going to they are I'm one of them. They're going to make a lot of mistakes. A lot of them, some are pretty bad, can be bad, financially hurtful, maybe physically hurtful at times. But it's it's it's that time to let go and let them live and make those mistakes because, you know, when they're young, that's when they can recover from them better and then get past them and then go look back and go, Man, I'm never doing that again. That's a great life lesson. They could only learn that by going through it. And if they didn't have the college experience, that might not happen. And so there are great things to come from it. So you talked about or I talked about, I brought it up. It was part of your your your bio. And I love this topic. It's on limiting beliefs. And I was curious, what is it you teach the students on limiting beliefs and how does that end up helping them in your experience?

Chris Carr:
Yeah. This has become one of the, I think. It's become a really a focus of my own. This is something I only really started to focus on in the last few years of my life. But it's been it's been such a I've been so grateful. It's been it's been like a godsend to to be have been introduced these ideas to different people and coach and coaches that I've worked with and mentors who are because I've always known that I love teaching and I want to help young people grow. And but it's not just like you said, the vocation is important, but that's not all of you. And the other the other things affect that and all the other aspects of your life could affect your career. It's not just your career path, and there are things that can get in the way. Like if you if you for me, it was a lot of anxiety and depression at times and a lot of it's like beliefs that I had about myself that were holding me back that I didn't even know, that I didn't even know what limiting beliefs were for most of probably until I was like maybe 40, 40 or so a few years ago. Like I'm 46 right now. Like it's it's opened up so much. But it also it also makes you face things that are not easy. They're not easy. There's no quick there's no quick fix. There's no magic, magic bullet. And there are things to look at, like, how are how are these things affecting me? Like and there's there's so many of them. It's not enough. I'm not I'm not good enough. I'm not smart enough. I'm not not tall enough, not good looking enough. I'm not this enough. Like there's a million different ones for any anyone can have and things that we might not even know that usually they're unconscious for a while. Like they're just things that we, we accept. And so I think for me it became. And it's one of the reasons why. It's almost like a cause and effect. Like, I knew I always had this tendency towards, like, wanting to start a business throughout my life in different stages.

Chris Carr:
I had different ideas that I want to do, and I always had this this inkling to do that. But I was like, Oh, I can't do that. I'm not good enough, not smart enough. I don't have enough money. I don't have that. I can't do that. No one's going to listen to me, whatever, whatever it might be. And now, now I've got I've gotten to the point where, like, I had that feeling to do something and didn't or I did it a little bit but didn't dive fully in. And that happened at different stages and in different areas, not not just in education, like in in my twenties. It was like I was interested in filmmaking and was doing that, but not really like really afraid. Like how am I going to make money for the rest of my life doing this? There's so many people doing this, especially like in artistic fields, I think in creative fields I think that comes up. But for me, like this, one of the main reasons I think it pushed me over the edge to to actually separate from my past position to launching this this current venture, which is in its early stages, was that this is where I need to go for my personal growth is and this is where the leadership comes up. It's like, here, here's where I am, here are the things that are stopping me, here's where I want to go. And and what are those blocks? Those things that are blocking me are not real. But there are things that I really like. I believe that there are things that I learned over the years from for whatever reason that are stopping me. And once you once you kind of as a with students, I would ask them to we a lot of it comes up in conversation through through like a lot of conversation, a lot of talking with students. Like what about their interests and values, What really lets them up and then what's stopping you? And then then eventually in that conversation, it comes up, Well, my parents want me to do this or I don't think I'm good enough in this field. Like they come out and the phrase is whatever the phrase is, and there could be multiple ones like it comes out through the through the getting to know the student and talking with them.

Chris Carr:
And then we say, okay, now we know what it is, and that's a great thing. It could be terrifying to look at, but it's great to identify it because now we know what to focus on and what's what's what's an isolate and say, here's the thing we need to work on that's stopping you from being what you want to be, what you want to be, and to go in the direction you want to go in. So that's something that again, has been like a godsend in my life and still in the early stages of moving past. I'm still moving through those things. And it's not it's not a one and done. You realize it and then it's over. But it's, it's, it's all about awareness and and being being self aware of being conscious of your thoughts and, and why you do the behavior, why you do the things that you do every day in different areas of your life. Why am I studying this thing? Why am I why am I going to this activity? Why am I talking to this person? Why? Why is it why am I friends with this person? You know, what am I? What's what's the not the benefit, but what's what's the attraction here? Like, what is this speaking to? And and it could be speaking to something really healthy. It could be speaking to something that maybe maybe is not good for you. And you need to like, look at and say they have I really want to develop myself and to go and be the best version of myself. Maybe I have to let go of that activity or that person, that or even people. It's really difficult to say, I need to let go of people in my life. Yes, at least for even for a certain time being. So that's it's like with students, like I, I think it's a little bit easier maybe when you get to be if you have a bunch of life 30, 40, 50, it's easier to say, Oh, I know exactly what's holding me back. It's a little bit more it takes a little bit more time or more because I think with younger people, like I just don't have with through no fault of their own, like not as much experience to have had things get in their way.

Chris Carr:
So take. But it comes out eventually in conversation and interaction and so part of it. Yeah. So that's why I like working with students over at least over a semester, if not over a longer period of time. Like just because it takes time to get to know those students and to see their patterns. And and then once you once it's identified, it's about here are some strategies to overcome it and then it's accountability. It's doing those things over time because correcting changing a habit is difficult. It's not just I want to get I want to I mean, that's why New Year's resolutions don't work, because like, people go to the gym for a couple of weeks and then the old habits just kick in. You have to really be focused and conscious of when you're slipping back into that old stuff and and like, no, I don't want to go that. Here's here's here's the thing that I don't know healthy people go to. So here I'm going to do I'm going to do what this what what this type of person does. I'm going to make you almost have to, like, make yourself into that. The person that does those type of things and have it changing takes time. And so that's why I really love working with students over a longer period of time to to help them with not just the awareness but the accountability. It's really a repeat repetition of those those new actions and having support. And so if something's going wrong, they can reach out to me and say, I'm I'm feeling this is happening. And I'm like, okay, okay, Remember what we said? Coach them back into like not going down that to that that habit they don't want to do or that that thing. But here's the thing that I want to be doing and.

Brian Kelly:
I mean, what a what a great concept to have someone like you as a mentor while they're going through college to help them navigate this journey and all the steps, the the peaks and valleys. And for parents of these students and students themselves, what would your advice be to them that there is a signal coming up that maybe repetitively that says, you know what, this is a time, I think, that we need to pull Chris Carr into this equation and get them a coach that can help them navigate these waters. What are those things that a parent and or student need to be aware of that they see that signal? Okay, I'm going to reach out to Chris.

Chris Carr:
Yeah, I think there's a couple of things. Well, I think I think there are definitely certain signals, but I think I think it's good to have. Stuff like that. Coaching on this level helps, you know, if, if, if students not doing well in the course or something like that, it takes real. I was astonished by the statistic I read. I think only about 40% of students that start college finish in four years.

Brian Kelly:
True.

Chris Carr:
Which astonished me. And it was in six years. It only goes up to 60% of students that finish their degree in six years. So there's this expectation again. What's the thing we're told? High school, four years of college. Get a job. What are all these things? And they get there and like, if you if you do well, do poorly in one class, it's like it's it's not that far. And then you get down on yourself. It's not that far before maybe you're on probation or suspended or something like that. It's really it's not it's a really slippery slope. It's a really quick decline. And I think it's a lot of times it's difficult to even manage your parents. Are they going to be need to give their students the freedom to develop themselves but also need to be? I think that's why it's good to have have someone who's not a family member and not not an employee of the school that the students go to to be on their side. Like for me, like I want to I position myself as like I'm the ally of the student. I'm on your side no matter in order to help you.

Brian Kelly:
And because of that, you are also by proxy, the ally of the parent. That's important.

Chris Carr:
Oh, yes. Yes.

Brian Kelly:
Right. So the parent doesn't look at you going, Yeah, but great, I'm glad you're helping out my kid. But they're going for their sixth year and I'm paying for it. Well, maybe they would have gone through eight if they didn't go and see Chris earlier, but I went through for four and a half. It wasn't a long time, but mine was due to I couldn't even get some of the classes that were part of my major. They were impacted. There are so many reasons that caused this to happen, so I ended up finishing it off in summer school so I could just be done. And luckily the classes I needed were available in summer school. Otherwise it would have been another full semester and another full summer of paying rent at this apartment, all that. So yeah, there's so much stress, so much pressure, a lot of that going on and oh my gosh, I think you've hit the nail on the head. An impartial third party, i.e. you, a mentor or a coach. This is what I teach and train all the time in the business realm is, I mean, come on. Michael Jordan, one of the greatest, if not the greatest basketball player who ever played. He had coaches and mentors all the time and paid a pretty penny for not just his team coaches where they were already covered, but he would bring in trainers like physical trainers to work out and and and just all kinds of specialty coaches. And why aren't we telling our kids to experience that from day one? Because that will only help them to excel in life in a much quicker manner by going down the right path, quicker by being told by a mentor like you. Chris Yeah, you really don't want to go down the path you're headed and here's why. Okay, lesson learned. I don't have to go through the next three to 4 to 5 months of doing the wrong thing. I now know it's the wrong thing, of course. Correct, because Chris gave me the right direction. And now you have someone you have a happy student, happier anyway, and you have a much happier parent. My God, I can tell you, I would have been happier if I had two kids. I had two kids through college, too. So what you do is an absolute godsend. And I'm so blessed to be able to have a platform in which to raise the voice of Chris Carr so people know you exist. This is this is a very unique. I've never heard of it. It's such a great thing you're doing. You're like a college student mentor. It's like and even probably high school as well. You also mentor. Okay.

Chris Carr:
Yeah. I start. I hopefully get them like at the end of high school and as they're going to college and then through college. But but it's the focus is on the college, but it also works for students that aren't going to college or taking a break before they go. Or even if you graduated from college and aren't sure of where you're going in your young adult life. It kind of it works for a lot of different ages. But, you know, helping students manage that, navigate that college experience, not just and it works for students that are high achievers, too, like not just students that are not doing well, like it works for how do I take go from where I am to go to the next level? Yeah, I mean.

Brian Kelly:
Even high achievers are so focused on that achievement, they don't realize there's a whole world out there like, Hey, I'm crushing it and what? And I know how to do this. I'm awesome at math, but you know, this art thing, I never knew it even existed. Let me try that out. And they might be really good at it, Right? And there's all those things. We're getting short on time here, but I know you have a gift. Go ahead.

Chris Carr:
And one more thing about even the high achievers, like it could be not just helping them find their path they might like at Brown University, my last job were like helping students applying for, like, the Rhodes Scholarship. These are really high, high performing students, but managing the process, those limiting beliefs. That was one of the biggest things I was I was doing with a lot of the students. They were it was a six month process to apply and they were really anxious and didn't think they were good enough. And they read the bios of the past winners and like, I can't compete with these people. And like, Yes, you can, you can't. Here's the next step. Do the next step. I'm taking them through. So it worked for for people that don't know where they're going, it works for people who do know what they're going. It works on a lot of different levels. And I love the example you gave about like people who are super high performers, like whether it's athletes or who are every every CEO has a business coach. Like why aren't when we're young there's there's this mentality of like, we have to figure it out ourselves. It has to be we have to go through it alone when we're young and then get to that successful point. And it just doesn't have to be that way.

Brian Kelly:
Yeah, it shouldn't be that way. And you can do you can become a more rounded individual that they're always trying to make you in college by getting external assistance and guidance from people like Chris Carr, who would mentor them through it. Now we're getting to the end here. Chris and I always like to ask this one question. I haven't forgotten everybody. We have not only one gift, but two. I didn't mention this earlier in the show, but Chris has a gift for everyone here, so don't go anywhere. We're not done yet. But Chris, I like to end every show with a very what I call a profound question. And I found it to be profound kind of on accident because I would ask it on occasion. Wow, these answers, they're pretty amazing. I'm going to I'm going to close every show out with this from now on. And they're really cool. They can be personal or they don't have to be personal, but they're very powerful. The answer is all and yours will be too. There will be no exception. But before we do that, I did promise everyone who stuck with us till the end that I would show them how they could win a five night stay at a five star luxury resort. Again, compliments of the big insider Secrets. You see their emblem up there above Chris's left shoulder on the right of the screen as you watch. One moment. And. What I want to do is reveal to you how you can enter a win. Now, when I bring this and put this up on the screen and tell you where to go, write it down. Don't go there yet. Just like in the beginning, write down the resource. There will be time for you to enter after the show is over. Don't sweat it. You've got a couple of hours, so don't. Don't worry about that. So I'm going to put it up on the screen to enter to win. And boy, I'm telling you, if you're watching, you do want to enter to win because these are legitimate vacation stays. Here's what you do. Write this down. R y p That stands for Reach Your Peak, which is my company's name, R.I.P.

Brian Kelly:
dot. I am forward slash vacation all lowercase so ripe I am for vacation. Drop that into your browser and all you have to do is enter your information. In there you will be automatically entered and the winner will be announced and contacted directly on how to get that incredible prize and choose the vacation of your dreams going in any of those destinations you saw from earlier. And then this little birdie, well, maybe not that little, but this guy named Chris Carr told me they also might just have a gift for you. So I'm going to pull it up on the screen. And Chris, I'll let you describe what it's about and how they can enter to or connect with you to get this gift as well.

Chris Carr:
Yeah. So just want to connect with with people who might be either have a student who's entering college or even in college or like I said, even at maybe beyond in the early, early adult years, but just a way to just to connect with a free consultation to talk about how. I can support your student or your the young adult they have who is like I said before, they either maybe not not sure of where they want to go or even if if they are sure and want to really take it to the next level. It works. It works either way. But I would love to love to hear from people. I'd love to have a conversation with you about what where your student is and where where they want to go and how we can get them there.

Brian Kelly:
And for parents and students are like, you know, you might be thinking, I'm not so sure about this. This is a new concept. Well, here's a way to find out. It's free. It cost you nothing. And you can you can look at Chris, you can listen to him. You can see that he is not going to be one of those hard sail artists that's going to put your thumbs in a screw and torch you until you say, yes, he's not that way. He's just going to say, this is what I do. What are you looking for? And are we a fit? If we are, let's talk to the next step. But at least you now know and you're aware that a service like this exists. Before the show. I didn't know this existed anywhere in the world. It probably does. I don't know. Maybe Chris is the one and only. I think it's a phenomenal service he provides. Now it's up to you to reach out to him and we'll give you that information just in a moment. How to do that and just find out is it a fit? That's it. You can see he's pretty easygoing guy. He's not going to he won't he won't bite. In fact, he can't because you probably won't be meeting physically together. So just reach out. He's a nice guy. You can tell. And he has a great heart. You can just see it and and feel it right now as we're talking about him. So let's put up your contact information, Chris, and you can tell them what the best way for them to reach out to you, what to say or what to type, to remind you that this is why they're coming to you.

Chris Carr:
Yeah, either call or text or that email if you but mind body business in the subject and or and constantly free console and just in the email if you send an email or text which is the little description that you wanted to connect and and there's also a link to it and also one point mentorship dot com will be up very shortly that's in the in the works that that will be a website where this will all be centralized there. But for the time being phone or email text just just reach out and it's like Brian said very easy going just just just connect I would love to love to hear from you.

Brian Kelly:
And for those of you listening on podcast and by the way, you do want to come on and watch this live so you can enter to win that wonderful thing. Plus you get to interact with us. We do get questions from the audience and put them up on screen and give you a shout out as well. But for those of you listening on podcast only, his phone number is 9172706721. And again text him and mention mind body business and also if you're texting them putting your name that would be helpful. And if you want to email him in there you know your your name may be part of your email, but also include your name just in case. Christopher that's Christo p h e r dot h as in what?

Chris Carr:
Henry.

Brian Kelly:
Henry. I was going to say, Henry, I didn't want to mess it up. It's H as in Henry. Pardon?

Chris Carr:
And the Christopher, as you mentioned. You said Chris.

Brian Kelly:
Oh, Chris. Chris. Incorrectly. I'm sorry. H All right. Stop. Thank you for correcting me. H Seriously, dot car with two ers. C a r r at gmail.com. And just in the subject line, like he said, put mind body business or free consultation for my student or for me as a student. Put in your name and your best way to contact. Get for him to reach back out to you. Take advantage of this. Really Please take advantage of this offer, but do not take advantage of Chris. Be mindful of his time and be respectful of his time. He's a professional. He's here to help you or your student, depending on who's watching or listening to this right now. And I commend you, Chris, and I'm so thankful that Amy Scruggs connected us. Thank you, Amy, for that amazing young man. And I'm very blessed to have made your acquaintance and now call you a friend. And that's it. Chris. We're and we're not family. You can't use family, and that's it. We're done.

Chris Carr:
So great.

Brian Kelly:
I don't want to weird you out. I'm just having fun.

Chris Carr:
But I'll be out for dinner tomorrow night.

Brian Kelly:
Okay? Hey, we're not far apart. We know that. We're not far apart. So, yeah, just a few minutes down the road. So I did mention this question. So the cool thing about this question, that it's coming right now, Chris, get ready. But the really cool thing about it is there is no such thing as a wrong answer. It doesn't exist. And the really cool thing is the only correct answer is yours. And that's the only thing that makes it personal because your answer will be unique to you. How do I know this? I've been doing this for three years. No two answers have ever been exactly the same. That's what's so profound about this thing. So with all that buildup, now that you're sweating profusely from the forehead, I'm kidding.

Chris Carr:
I have nothing to study like the academic. And he wants to study more, but I'm ready.

Brian Kelly:
All right, So, Chris, are you ready?

Chris Carr:
Yep.

Brian Kelly:
All right, here we go. Chris Carr, how do you define success?

Chris Carr:
Six us. I think that, yeah, the foundation of it is a lot of the things we've talked we've talked about or one of the main things is self awareness and, and I think consciousness as well, like really is connected to who we are, what are our individual goals and values and interests. And that's something we can only define for ourselves. It's very easy. Yeah, I think there's a lot of easy definitions for success that are given to us or shown to us. A lot of them have to do with material things, which is, yeah, that's great as well like being. But I think going, going right to there without connecting personally to that, to what success means, it could mean a high powered career could mean being an amazing caretaker for your children at home. You could be an amazing cook. It could be, you know, you throw really great parties for your neighborhood. I don't I don't know. It could be anything. It could be whatever. Whatever you love doing. I think success is doing what lights you up. And yeah, that can take whatever. For me, it's helping young people to grow. And also I'm a I'm a drummer, so I love playing music as well. For me, music is another a close second to helping young people is, is, is drumming and playing music. So that's that's part of what lights me up in success is I think sharing that, sharing that gift with other people and connecting with connecting with other people around the gifts that we have and the just to raise the the vibration of the people around us and ourselves. And and I think the success, all the like monetary success and things of that come as a byproduct of of doing that, doing the things that really led us up.

Brian Kelly:
That is what I call a bomb dropping moment, right? That's right. Smart bombs. Bombs of wisdom. Arms of knowledge. That is Chris Carr to a tee right there. Thank you so much for spending all this wonderful time, Chris. I mean, this was I truly enjoyed this discussion because of it was a little bit of a turn from what I'm normally used to talking about and I really enjoyed thoroughly because everything you're talking about is going to help students and their parents. That's the beautiful thing. It's not just helping one person, it's it's helping a family. And all they have to do is reach out to you at no cost for an initial consultation just to test the waters. And so when you do that, when you get in touch with Chris, just be sure to come with that in mind to know that his time is valuable. He could be helping others and serving others and be focused about. Well, Chris, you know, I have a student and I would like to look at maybe bringing on your services. Let's have a chat. What is it I need to know about what you do and you can get into the cost and all that later, but find out if it's fit first and then move forward. But be respectful of his time as I know he will be of yours. You can just tell he's that kind of guy. You're a great guy, Chris, and I appreciate what you're doing. What you're doing is serving. It's such a need. And I saw it immediately. Oh, I didn't know. Had he met you yet? I read your bio and your background like, Oh, my God, where was this when I was a kid? This is awesome. So thank you for what you do for everyone and please continue to do it as long as you're humanly possible. And if that means scaling your business, bringing on consultants to to take over the what you're doing daily, do whatever it takes. I hope you crush it and spread this far and wide so that our students come out of college or go into college, leave high school, and then go into life more prepared and they live a more fulfilled and happy life and their parents are happier as well. So I appreciate you, my friend.

Chris Carr:
Absolutely. I appreciate you. Thanks so much for having me. It's been really fun.

Brian Kelly:
Oh, yes. It's been an absolute blast. So. All right. Well, all good things, as they say, must come to an end. They don't really have to. We could go on for several more hours because I'm not paying for studio time. I'm just respectful of Chris's time and all. You know, I see yours as well, the watchers and viewers. So are listeners, I should say. So on that note, we will call it a night, and I appreciate you again, Chris, on behalf of this amazing gentleman, Chris Carr. I am Brian Kelly, the host of the Mind Body Business Show. And Until We Meet again, which is very, very soon, in about a week, I just want to say to all of you, continue to go out there and crush it and serve more people and above all else, be blessed. Everyone. Take care for now. Thank you for tuning in to the Mind Body Business Show podcast at www.TheMindBodyBusinessShow.com My name is Brian Kelly.

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Chris Carr

Chris Carr holds a PhD in Slavic Studies from Brown University and has worked in higher education for the past 15 years. He founded One Point Mentorship to support high-school students transitioning into college. One Point helps students to develop their own personal visions, identify limiting beliefs that hold them back, and craft a plan for execution and accountability in all areas of their lives, emphasizing the importance of academic writing and leadership skills.

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